• de
  • en

Dr. Noëmie Duhaut

Member of the academic staff, Department of History
Room: 02 305
Phone: +49 6131-39 39428
Fax: +49 6131 39 35326

E-Mail


Personal Details:

Noëmie Duhaut was born in Nancy, France. She studied Eastern European and Jewish history at University College London and the University of Belgrade. She holds a PhD in History (2017) from University College London. Supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Posen Society of Fellows, her thesis focused on French Jewish international advocacy in the nineteenth century and investigated how and why the elite of French Jewry constructed a supranational European identity in this period. Prior to joining the IEG in May 2019, she was a visiting scholar at Dartmouth College and subsequently held postdoctoral fellowships at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Central European University in Budapest.

Research Interests:

Modern European Jewish history
Jewish politics and diplomacy
Transnational history
History of international law
History of colonialism and imperialism

Memberships:

Association for Jewish Studies (AJS)
British Association for Jewish Studies (BAJS)
European Association for Jewish Studies (EAJS)
Society for the Study of French History (SSFH)

Research projects:

A European French patriot? Adolphe Crémieux as a defender of minority rights across imperial lines

Broadly speaking my work deals with the relationship between French, European and Jewish identities in the nineteenth century. My new research project is a biography of the French Jewish lawyer and statesman Adolphe Crémieux (1796–1880). He has attracted little attention from historians despite being a crucial figure in nineteenth-century French, European, and Jewish politics. In contrast to earlier francocentric approaches, this biography analyses his role in the wider transnational, European and colonial contexts. The second innovation is to examine how the various aspects of his career as a lawyer, politician and defender of Jewish rights at home and abroad influenced each other.